10 Examples of Social Media ROI [Infographic]

Does social media drive ROI? Many brands are still plagued by this question. 

Social media ROIThe immediacy and visibility offered by social media marketing has convinced most business owners that it’s worth their time and effort, but calculating its effectiveness is another story. Best practices for measurement are still evolving, and even though brands are committing an increasing percentage of their budgets to social channels, many are still skeptical about its value and return on investment (ROI). What’s a marketer to do?

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Content Marketing: How to Measure Its Effectiveness [Infographic]

Content marketing metrics can be confusing and preoccupy your time, so start by selecting a just a few fundamentals to measure.

Content Marketing: How to Measure Its Effectiveness Content marketing is key in today’s marketplace — it is the intersection of awareness and lead generation. Brands must provide a steady stream of articles, photos, videos, and other resources to demonstrate their relevancy and bring in new customers. While some large companies like Sears, Coca-Cola, and Kraft have quickly caught on to content marketing and are able to accurately measure and leverage their results, it’s not always easy to quantify the value of a piece of content. What makes this process so tricky?

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Use Pinterest Web Analytics to Jumpstart Your Social Media Marketing

Pinterest Web Analytics gives site owners insights into how people are interacting with pins that originate from their websites.

Use Pinterest Analytics for marketingWith more than 48 million users, Pinterest is one of the most popular social networks on the Web. Rather than telling people about your products, Pinterest makes it possible to show what you have to offer. Companies are increasingly using the platform to reach new audiences, increase visits to their websites, and generate leads and sales — and it’s working.

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The Gap Between Social Customers and Social Marketers

More than three-quarters (76%) of social media marketers say they know what their customers want, but only one-third (34%) have actually asked them.

Shocking, right? One of the basic tenets of marketing — know your customers — is being ignored by the vast majority of brands that are trying to achieve success with social media marketing. There’s a major disconnect between what consumers desire and what they actually receive from the brands they follow on social networks. It’s no wonder marketers have trouble getting good results.

A revealing research report from the team at Pivot documents the growing gap between marketers and customers. The data shows that consumers and brands are far apart when it comes to perceptions, behaviors, attitudes, and expected benefits. This divide, which industry analyst Brian Solis calls the perception gap, presents a problem for brands that are trying to maximize user engagement and conversion rates on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. Marketers must reach out directly to their audience and offer them what they want — if they don’t, they’ll suffer the consequences in terms of awareness, engagement, and revenue.

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Facebook Stores Deliver Sames Sales Rates as Web Sites

According to a new white paper from Webtrends, Facebook stores now have the same sales conversion rates as e-commerce Web sites. “The Effect of Social Networks and the Mobile Web on Website Traffic and the Inevitable Rise of Facebook Commerce” was created in conjunction with Adgregate Markets, a leader in distributed Web commerce that creates Facebook storefronts for its customers.

Findings from the report indicate that e-commerce may be one of the factors protecting Web sites from the influence of Facebook:

  • Among the 44 companies examined, 18 of them (about 40%) exhibited extremely high traffic to their Facebook page compared to their Web sites. Not only were their Web sites accounting for fewer unique visits than Facebook, but many were also showing a decline in visits over a three-month period.
  • Of the 22 categorized as ‘Non-E-commerce’, 13 companies (about 65%) received more unique visits to their Facebook page versus their Web site:

  • Two companies that exhibited extremely high Facebook traffic were Coca-Cola and Walt Disney:

  • Of the 22 companies that offer e-commerce transactions, only five exhibited promising Facebook trends, while the rest (about 77%) had very consistent traffic to their Web sites. Even though these sites currently fare better than Facebook, their future growth is questionable since many have started to experience significant drops in unique visits compared to last year:

The report’s found that while many Facebook stores have a nascent operating history, several important trends are emerging:

  • Facebook stores are efficient at acquiring visitors cheaply through wall posts, with post-launch wall posts generating on average 1,673% spikes in store traffic.
  • One month after store launch, the base level of traffic equals 1 to 10% of fan base.
  • Facebook stores on average generate a 17% social engagement rate (merchandise “likes” and “shares” per visitor).
  • Facebook stores generated on average Earned Media Reach to friends of fans equal to 25% of fan base. (Earned Media Reach is defined as additional reach to friends of fans through fan activity within a store, e.g. when visitors “like” and “share” products.).
  • Facebook stores generated on average 5.9 pages views per visit.
  • Facebook store dwell times average 2:50 per visit, growing 50% over the last three months.
  • Facebook commerce conversion rates range from 2% to 4% and are on par with e-Commerce Web sites. (avg. 3.4%, according to Forrester/Shop.org).

So the game is no longer about the comforts of your Web site’s ‘Walled Garden’, but about the risks and rewards of arriving on the social network. Read the full report to see all of its conclusions, including the fact that social and mobile networks will dominate the online traffic landscape in a big way, decreasing traffic to content as well as e-Commerce Web sites

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How to Calculate the ROI of Enterprise Social Media

Is social media really worth it for big companies? Sure, there are lots of success stories involving small local businesses, including the recently popular street-food vendor craze. And both Groupon and Foursquare have contributed to small-business success.

But are social-media initiatives really valuable for large corporations? And how should an enterprise go about calculating the ROI of its efforts?

Here’s an infographic from SocialCast that examines what is working for large businesses and why. The three key areas to examine are:

  • The level of employee engagement
  • The employee turnover rate
  • Sales results

Companies can use the suggestions below for how to measure each area to determine whether their efforts are improving the bottom line. And be sure to check out my list of 100+ monitoring tools to track and manage your brand’s engagement and reputation in the social-media sphere.

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Calculate the Value of Your Facebook Page

Marketers are clamoring for data to determine the ROI of their social-media efforts, and a new free tool called the Social Page Evaluator, from social media management company Vitrue, is here to help. It’s designed to assist marketers as they try to get a better grasp of the value of a brand’s Facebook Page.

A Facebook Page is commonly referred to as “fan page”, and its purpose is to provide a platform for brands to connect and communicate with their audience. Pages come in many varieties: they can represent actual brands, organizations, non-profits, and other entities — including people, blogs, etc. When you engage and opt-in on a brand’s Facebook Page, you “like” (formerly “Become a Fan”) them.

The Social Page Evaluator is easy to use. Enter the URL of any Facebook Page and it will examine its fan count, post frequency, and various fan interactions with the Page and calculate a valuation. The formula used by the application is related to the formula that Vitrue recently released to estimate the relative value of Facebook Fans to large brands. The tool is adjustable and interactive — for example, the base rate of Earned Media Value (or CPM) is $5, but this can be adjusted higher or lower. There is also a “Fan-tasize” section that enables you to tweak other features like number of posts per day, engagement level, and fan count to see how these impact the valuation.

The interface allows you to compare a Facebook Page with up to three other brands and to view a Page’s value history. In addition to the valuation data, there is also a list of best practices for getting the most out of your Facebook Page that offers a breakdown of contributing factors to your Page’s current value and suggestions about how to improve engagement.

This tool isn’t completely scientific, but it’s one way way to gauge value of a Page to advertisers and to see the factors that impact a Facebook Page valuation. It’s also a good catalyst for thinking about the potential advertising power of a Page.

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