8 Free Content Marketing eBooks

Become a better content marketer with these free resources.

60 Content marketing resourcesContent marketing — the creation and sharing of content to promote a product or service — should be a primary focus of your marketing activities. It’s a very effective way to engage your audience, establish yourself as an expert, and promote your brand. The focal point of all of assets you create for this purpose doesn’t need to be around your company or products — it can also include a mix of problem-solving information and thought leadership. The more useful your content is, the more likely your readers will be to share it with others via social media and amplify your brand’s reach.

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The 4 Most Effective Twitter Calls to Action

What should I tweet?

4 Most Effective Twitter Calls to ActionThis is one of the most common questions that brands ask. Data from a recent study conducted by Optimal indicates that Twitter delivers a smaller — but more active — audience than Facebook. But Twitter is less understood as a marketing channel, and many social media marketers are unsure about what to do when it comes to executing well-planned promotional strategies on the platform. So what can you do to jumpstart a Twitter initiative using 140 characters or less?

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Use Pinterest Web Analytics to Jumpstart Your Social Media Marketing

Pinterest Web Analytics gives site owners insights into how people are interacting with pins that originate from their websites.

Use Pinterest Analytics for marketingWith more than 48 million users, Pinterest is one of the most popular social networks on the Web. Rather than telling people about your products, Pinterest makes it possible to show what you have to offer. Companies are increasingly using the platform to reach new audiences, increase visits to their websites, and generate leads and sales — and it’s working.

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Facebook Stores Deliver Sames Sales Rates as Web Sites

According to a new white paper from Webtrends, Facebook stores now have the same sales conversion rates as e-commerce Web sites. “The Effect of Social Networks and the Mobile Web on Website Traffic and the Inevitable Rise of Facebook Commerce” was created in conjunction with Adgregate Markets, a leader in distributed Web commerce that creates Facebook storefronts for its customers.

Findings from the report indicate that e-commerce may be one of the factors protecting Web sites from the influence of Facebook:

  • Among the 44 companies examined, 18 of them (about 40%) exhibited extremely high traffic to their Facebook page compared to their Web sites. Not only were their Web sites accounting for fewer unique visits than Facebook, but many were also showing a decline in visits over a three-month period.
  • Of the 22 categorized as ‘Non-E-commerce’, 13 companies (about 65%) received more unique visits to their Facebook page versus their Web site:

  • Two companies that exhibited extremely high Facebook traffic were Coca-Cola and Walt Disney:

  • Of the 22 companies that offer e-commerce transactions, only five exhibited promising Facebook trends, while the rest (about 77%) had very consistent traffic to their Web sites. Even though these sites currently fare better than Facebook, their future growth is questionable since many have started to experience significant drops in unique visits compared to last year:

The report’s found that while many Facebook stores have a nascent operating history, several important trends are emerging:

  • Facebook stores are efficient at acquiring visitors cheaply through wall posts, with post-launch wall posts generating on average 1,673% spikes in store traffic.
  • One month after store launch, the base level of traffic equals 1 to 10% of fan base.
  • Facebook stores on average generate a 17% social engagement rate (merchandise “likes” and “shares” per visitor).
  • Facebook stores generated on average Earned Media Reach to friends of fans equal to 25% of fan base. (Earned Media Reach is defined as additional reach to friends of fans through fan activity within a store, e.g. when visitors “like” and “share” products.).
  • Facebook stores generated on average 5.9 pages views per visit.
  • Facebook store dwell times average 2:50 per visit, growing 50% over the last three months.
  • Facebook commerce conversion rates range from 2% to 4% and are on par with e-Commerce Web sites. (avg. 3.4%, according to Forrester/Shop.org).

So the game is no longer about the comforts of your Web site’s ‘Walled Garden’, but about the risks and rewards of arriving on the social network. Read the full report to see all of its conclusions, including the fact that social and mobile networks will dominate the online traffic landscape in a big way, decreasing traffic to content as well as e-Commerce Web sites

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Use Google Analytics to Track Inbound Links From Social Media Profiles

You can track referrals from Facebook or Twitter in Google Analytics, but what if you want to track specific links within your social media profiles to measure their effectiveness? For example, what if I want to see how many people visit pamorama.net by clicking on my Twitter profile link? This tutorial will teach you the simple steps you need to take — and this method can be used in conjunction with any of your social profiles: Facebook, LinkedIn, or the legion of others.

1: Create a trackable link

Head over to Google’s URL Builder to create a URL that can be tracked separately in Google Analytics. Fill in the spaces as indicated in this screenshot with information about your social media profile:

2: Shorten your trackable link

Google’s URL Builder will create a very long URL, so it’s a good idea to shorten it with one of the many available online shorteners. For the example below, I used bit.ly, but any of them will do the trick:

3: Add your shortened trackable link to your social media profile

You’ve created a trackable link and shortened it — now you need to add it to the the social media profiles you want to track.

4: Track your URL in Google Analytics beginning the next day

Since you used Google’s URL Builder, the link will be tracked automatically in Google Analytics each time someone clicks on on it. You’ll be able to see your referrals by going to Google Analytics -> Traffic Sources -> Campaigns. Google Analytics takes about a day to begin reporting the referrals.

Have you used Google Analytics this way? What did you learn from the data?

 

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How to Monitor Your Brand Using Twitter Search

More and more business and organizations are beginning to realize that Twitter is an excellent (and free) way for them to monitor how people feel about their brand, company, or product. With users pouring out their thoughts in 140-character bursts, a great deal of discussion revolves around products and services. These tweets are very relevant because other consumers can read and be affected by them.

So it’s important to know how to track your brand or products (and those of your competitors) on Twitter.

This great video tutorial offers some simple techniques to get you started. It was created by by John Haydon. His company, Inbound Zombie, helps small businesses and nonprofits get more customers, build communities, and increase awareness. He’s also a contributor at SocialBrite.

He demonstrates how to create saved searches for:

  • Your name
  • Your username
  • Your brand
  • Your competitors
  • Keywords related to your industry

He also explains how to:

  • Use Backtweets to track URL mentions
  • Get to know the advanced search option on Twitter
  • Search from, to, and/or about users, search by location, etc.
  • Create RSS feeds for your Twitter search results
  • Create e-mail alerts for your Twitter search results using TweetBeep

If you educate yourself about how they work, search engines will become one of your most valuable tools.

Have you used Twitter Search to monitor your brand? What about Backtweets or TweetBeep? Please share your experience…

(Image: Matt Hamm)

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