Social Networks: Winners and Losers [Infographic]

Here in the U.S., the big kid on the social media block is Facebook. But a look at social networks around the world shows that there are many platforms competing for niche markets.

This informative infographic from Ignite Social Media offers some interesting statistics. It shows the rising stars and the fading lights of social media, as well as stats about what kinds of people are using which apps. Have you ever wondered which social networks are most popular with men? With women? Which platform has the oldest demographic? Where do the wealthiest among us go for their networking needs? The background data for this analysis came from Google, largely through Google Insight for Search and Google Ad Planner.

Read More

Content Sharing Trends in 2010 [Infographic]

The link sharing service AddThis, which announced last month that it’s now tracking the interests of more than 1 billion people across the Web, has created an infographic that breaks down the most popular destinations for content shared through its widget. Sites that utilize AddThis enable readers to send pages of interest to friends through more than 300 different methods.

So what’s the most popular way people share? Facebook. The runner-up? E-mail.

In an interesting snapshot of the evolving world of media distribution, AddThis reports that Facebook’s piece of the sharing pie grew from 33% last year to 44%. AddThis also determined that e-mail, the second most popular method of sharing through its service, is 38% bigger than sharing on Twitter. And MySpace, though it’s in sharp decline (-27%), remains very popular. Of course there are many different ways to share content (the subject of a future post), but these numbers from AddThis are interesting and, given Facebook’s growing popularity and e-mail’s enduring importance, probably mirror results from other sharing services. The data helps drive home the importance of making it easy for your Web and blog visitors to share your content by by many different means.

Check out the infographic below, and click to view full size:

Enhanced by Zemanta

Social Media Demographics: An Analysis of the Leading Sites

Social media sites have grown exponentially in the last several years, and each one attracts different types of users. Flowtown created this interesting infographic that breaks down user demographics for the leading social networks by age, gender, income, and education level. Curious about which site has the greatest percentage of female users? What about those with the highest income? Click on the graphic to see the full-sized version:

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]


Social Media Users’ Interests and Expectations Vary by Network [Stats]

If you’re thinking of committing precious time or marketing dollars to social media, a new study from online advertising network Chitika offers some useful insights and may help ensure that your message is reaching the right audience. It shows that users’ interests and expectations vary sharply depending on the platform they’re using.

Based on a sample of over 287,000 impressions, the study examined outbound traffic from four social sites. Researchers learned that nearly half of the traffic (47%) that Twitter generates goes to news sites — Twitter users’ interest in news outpaces that of Facebook users by nearly 20%, apparently making it the most popular social network for news junkies. On MySpace, users seek out celebrity gossip and video games — and MySpace is the only site in the sample that doesn’t refer a significant amount of traffic to news destinations. Celebrity/entertainment is the only genre in the top 5 of all sites, demonstrating that many of us are very interested in exploits of the rich and famous.



Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Social Media: Everybody’s Doing It, But For Different Reasons [Charts]

While the demographics of the average social media user mirror the average U.S. adult (i.e., everyone’s socializing online in some way), a recent Retail Advertising and Marketing Association survey conducted by BIGresearch shows types of social media use vary greatly by age and gender. The survey, “Social Media: An Inside Look at the People Who Use It”, compares U.S. users on the social Web to the average American adult. But even with all the Twitter chitchat, Facebook fan groups, and blogs to be followed, consumers believe face-to-face communication is the most powerful.

Here are some interesting graphs from the report — mouse over them to see the underlying details:

View the full research report (PDF)

View the raw research data comparing social media users to U.S. adults 18+ (PDF)

View the raw research data comparing all social media user demographics (PDF)

Takeaways from the report:

  • 70% of social media users between the ages of 18-34 regularly use Facebook more than other sites such as MySpace, Twitter, and Classmates.com
  • 72% of social media users say that after an online search, they communicate with others about a product or service with face-to-face communication
  • More people who use social media prefer to give advice about a product or service rather than receive it
  • Social media users are more likely to use other new media compared to adults 18+
  • 71% of female social media users regularly use Facebook, compared to 61% of males
  • More men than women prefer to communicate with others via a cell phone conversation after searching for a product or service online


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Facebook Catching Up to Google and Yahoo as Your Home on the Web [Chart]

Facebook is bearing down on its rivals, threatening to become U.S. Internet users’ home on the Web.

Time spent on Facebook soared to 27.6 billion minutes in December, up from 17.8 billion minutes in October, according to data from comScore. (In December 2008, it was just 9.3 billion minutes.)

Google, where users spent 36 billion minutes in December, managed consistent slow growth in the second half of the year. Meanwhile, online rivals like Yahoo, Microsoft, and MySpace are all down.

It’s especially ugly for Yahoo.

  • Yahoo which fancies itself as your home on the Internet, has seen time spent on the site slowly decline, despite its big ad campaign.
  • Its uniques are flat, while Facebook’s are growing.
  • And, it’s not shown in this chart, but comScore says Facebook had more pages viewed in December than Yahoo for the first time ever — 44.9 billion for Facebook versus 38.8 billion for Yahoo.

Carol Bartz knows Facebook is coming. On Yahoo’s earnings call she said, “we are actually happy with the engagement we are seeing with us. We just can’t keep up with that [Facebook’s] kind of engagement.”

(Via Silicon Alley Insider, Jay Yarow & Kamelia Angelova)


Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Advertisers Embrace Facebook, Other Social Networks

Social ad spending will become a higher priority in 2010, with the combination of mobile and social advertising generating more opportunities for advertisers to reach their target markets for branding and engagement. eMarketer forecasts that 2009 ad spending on social networks will surpass $1.2 billion when all expenditures are tallied, a year-over-year increase of almost 4%. And social-media ad spending is anticipated to grow more than 7% next year:

109034

According to Debra Aho Williamson, author of the report Social Network Ad Spending: 2010 Outlook:

As more marketers incorporate social networks in their business, they will no longer look at them as siloed destinations. Instead, they will look to increase the impact of their social network presence by linking it to other marketing initiatives, both online and offline.

So social network advertising is set to intersect with other kinds of advertising. Geotargeting, earned media (the additional unpaid exposure a brand receives when consumers talk about it online), social search, and social ad networks will be pivotal themes next year.

Facebook has become the preferred social network for marketers

Facebook is poised to surpass MySpace in advertising revenue. At 350 million users, Facebook is the premier destination for marketers in the U.S. and in many other countries. In 2010, marketers are expected to spend more than $600 million on Facebook (vs. $385 million for MySpace), accounting for nearly one-fourth of worldwide social-network ad spending — up from 20% in 2009:

109039

Facebook Pages are increasingly becoming an integral part of brand advertising.  They will become even more popular as Facebook introduces the Open Graph API, enabling branded social experiences to occur anywhere on the Web.

Williamson also says,

When companies budget for social media marketing in 2010 and beyond, a substantial portion of their expenses will go toward creating and maintaining a fan page, managing promotions or public relations outreach within a social network, and measuring the impact of a social network presence on brand health and sales.

The viability of social media advertising was reinforced during the holiday shopping season, as many retailers turned to social media destinations like Facebook and Twitter to bolster their efforts to reach potential shoppers. Kohl’s, Best Buy, and Target were among the companies that leveraged social networks for customer engagement. Online ad spending dropped overall in 2009, but the increase in buys on social networks has created opportunities for brands to increase their market share. Ad buys on these sites could account for up to 5.4% of all online advertising.

As advertisers search for new avenues to grab customers’ discretionary income, the shift away from traditional online advertising will continue to accelerate.

What’s your opinion? Do you think Facebook will surpass MySpace? How has MySpace been able to retain its revenue lead for so long? Please leave a comment!

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]