15 Informative 2012 Marketing Infographics

15 Informative 2012 Marketing InfographicsWe live in the age of data. The information collected by the world’s databases grows by an astounding 40% annually. How we collect, harness, and use this content shapes our lives — our work, our relationships, everything. 

One way to make the fire hose of information more understandable is to use visual representations, which is why infographics have taken the Internet by storm over the past few years. I’ve posted quite a few of them in my blog because, if done well, infographics illustrate data in a way that makes it clear and actionable.

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10 Facts About Consumer Behavior on Facebook

A new study by marketing firm Constant Contact and research company Chadwick Martin Bailey sheds light on how consumers interact with brands on Facebook. According to 10 Quick Facts You Should Know About Consumer Behavior on Facebook (below), it turns out that people engage with their favorite brands on Facebook far more than on any other social network.

CMB asked 1,491 respondents to share their social media habits. The data shows that more than half of Americans over the age of 18 spend an hour or more each week on Facebook, and over a quarter of them are connecting with their favorite brands.

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Women Dominate Social Networks

According to a new study from comScore, social networking sites reach a higher percentage of women than men. “Women on the Web: How Women Are Shaping the Internet”, found that 76% of women visit a social networking site compared to 70% of men.

Globally, women demonstrate higher engagement levels with social networking sites than men. Using data from May 2010, comScore reported that although women comprise 48% of total unique visitors to the social networking category, they consume 57% of pages and account for nearly 57% of total minutes spent on these sites.

Women spend significantly more time on social networking sites than men, with women averaging 5.5 hours per month compared to 4 hours for men — this demonstrates women’s strong engagement with social sites.

On average, women spend more time online per month, 25 hours vs. 23 hours for men. But, when it comes to the social Web, there’s an even bigger divergence between the sexes. “Nearly 56 percent of adult women say they use the Internet to stay in touch with people, compared to 46% of adult men,” according to the report. comScore identifies higher activity levels in social categories such as social networking, instant messenger, and e-mail.

Those behaviors equate to women spending an average of 16.3% of their online time per month on social networks, a percentage that continues to rise month-to-month. Men spend just 11.7% of their time on the same activities.

Latin America and North America Display Strongest Social Networking Reach Among Women

Perhaps reflecting cultural differences, the relative importance of social networking varies across countries. However, no matter the location, women are consistently more social on the Web than their male counterparts. The social Web’s influence among women is highest in Latin America, where it reached 94% of females online, and in North America, where 91% engaged. 86% of Europe’s female online population visit a social networking site, while Asia Pacific, where parts of the region still have site restrictions and low broadband penetration, reported a 55% reach.

Social Networking Category Reach by Worldwide Region for Females and Males
May 2010
Total Audience, Age 15+ – Home & Work Locations*
Source: comScore Media Metrix
Social Networking % Reach by Region
Females Males
Worldwide 75.8% 69.7%
Latin America 94.1% 91.9%
North America 91.0% 87.5%
Europe 85.6% 80.6%
Asia Pacific 54.9% 50.7%

Other takeaways from the report:

  • Although men are in the majority across the global Internet, women spend about 8% more time online.
  • Globally, women spend 20% more time on retail sites overall than men. Among the various retail sub-categories, Comparison Shopping and Apparel sites reached the highest percentage of women at 24.8% and 18.7%, respectively, in May 2010.
  • In the U.S., women are more avid online buyers than men, with 12.5% of female Internet users making an online purchase in February 2010, compared to 9.3% of men.
  • Health sites show some of the largest overall differences in reach between female and male, with a nearly 6-point gap between global women and men.
  • In most countries women spend far less time watching online video than men, but women spend a much higher share of their time watching videos on YouTube than men.
  • In both the U.S. and Europe, smartphone usage is dominated by men with both markets experiencing close to a 60/40 split in smartphone adoption between the genders.

Download “Women on the Web: How Women are Shaping the Internet“.

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How Women Use Social Media [Infographic]

Social media sites are having a powerful effect on our lives. It’s important for marketers to understand how people use social networks, and Ethan Bloch of Flowtown has created a great infographic that shows how women leverage the social Web, which sites they use, and how much/why they participate.

Women are online and interacting on social sites just as much — if not, more — than their male counterparts. More than half of all American women participate in social media at least once a week, and younger women use it the most.

Takeaways:

  • 53% of adult females use social media at least on a weekly basis.
  • Their top interests are entertainment, food, health/wellness, and recipes/cooking. Fashion/beauty/shopping comes in fifth.
  • 34% of women use social networks to get information, while 20% of women are looking for advice and recommendations.

Click the image below to see the full-sized version:




The Social Habit: Who Uses Social Media and How

Edison Research just released its latest report on social network usage. The study compares the behavior and demographics of frequent users of social media to those of the population at large. The data is based on a nationally representative telephone survey of 1,753 Americans (including 371 mobile phone interviews) ages 12+ conducted in February, 2010.

Here are the principal findings from the report:


1. With both usage of social networks and the frequency of that usage increasing dramatically, we are truly witnessing a sea change in how mainstream consumers communicate.


2. Though social networking is rapidly becoming more common throughout the wider population, it is still most popular among the young; students are especially overrepresented.


3. Women are bigger social media users than men.


4. The biggest social networkers are, unsurprisingly, more likely to be big Internet users and early-adopters of new gadgets. But they still think the mobile phone is the technology that has had the biggest impact on their lives.


5. Frequent social networkers are also more likely to update their status on those networks — i.e., create content online — which has implications for word-of-mouth marketing and search.


6. Not only are frequent social networkers posting more status updates, they are also more likely to follow brands/companies than the average social media user — which makes identifying and appealing to those with the “social habit” crucial for brands.


7. Mobile access to social media is almost certainly a significant contributor to frequency of usage.


8. The data for frequent social networkers’ usage of podcasts, online video, and online audio supports the assumption that a significant amount of content is being consumed on-demand, potentially at the point where such content is shared.


9. Americans with “the social habit” are watching significantly less traditional television, but potentially consuming (and sharing) more “video” through alternative means.


Download the entire report (PDF) here →



Facebook is Now the Leading Publisher of Web Display Ads

Thanks to steady traffic growth and an ad-friendly redesign, Facebook’s ad impressions took off in the first quarter of 2010. According to comScore, it’s now the leading publisher of display ads in the U.S., pulling ahead of long-time leader Yahoo. Data from comScore shows that Facebook served 176.3 billion ads to U.S. customers in Q1, which is 16.2% of the total market. Yahoo and Microsoft served 131.6 billion and 60.2 billion ads respectively.

An important fact to keep in mind is that Facebook isn’t monetizing these impressions at the same rate as its rivals, and that these stats demonstrate Facebook’s dominance only as a publisher. Microsoft and Yahoo serve ads on other sites through their ad networks — and, in fact, Microsoft delivers most of the ads that appear on Facebook. But this is a huge milestone for Facebook, and helps solidify its position as the largest destination on the Web. And Facebook’s ascent could help fuel the online advertising market, which shrank during the recession — as budgets have returned, display ads have recently rebounded strongly.

Facebook’s ad growth also reflects increased demand from both large and small advertisers, says comScore Chief Marketing Officer Linda Abraham. It “remains to be seen” whether its growth is coming at the expense of rivals,  she said. “The data has to play out over the next couple of months to definitely say that.”

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What Types of Social Media Ads are Most Effective for Brands? [Stats]

As new ways to engage consumers and market products on the social Web keep multiplying, it’s important to stay abreast of best practices for brands. Research firm Psychster partnered with Allrecipes.com to find out which types of advertising yield the best results.

The study tested 7 different types of ads on two different publisher Web sites, Facebook and Allrecipes:

  1. Banner ads
  2. Newsletter subscription ads
  3. Corporate profiles with fans and logos
  4. Corporate profiles without fans and logos
  5. Get widgets
  6. Give widgets
  7. Sponsored content

Participants were shown a video of an ad type and an interaction and were asked to rate how likely they were to interact with the ad as the video did. They were also asked what their opinion was of the brand sponsoring the ads (either a car brand or a soup brand).

Results:

  • Banner ads and newsletter links were the most successful at encouraging purchase.
  • Sponsored content produced the highest interaction ratings, but the lowest purchase intent and viral recommendations of the 7 ad types. So this type of ad may be a good marketing strategy for raising brand awareness and generating positive associations/brand engagement, but isn’t the best choice for increasing sales.
  • Corporate profiles caused higher purchase intent only when people could become a fan and put a logo on their own profile.
  • Give and get widgets were more engaging than banners and newsletters, but they didn’t increase purchase intent or the likelihood of recommending a product to a friend. Since widgets are pricey, tweets and links may be a better choice.
  • The success of an ad was increased by matching the brand with the Web site (e.g. a soup ad on a recipe site).

Takeaways:

  • If your goals are brand awareness and positive associations, sponsored content may be your best bet.
  • If you’re trying to increase purchasing and loyalty, go with profiles that allow people to become fans and add logos to their own profiles.
  • If you’re targeting purchasing and the best ROI, good old banners and newsletters rule.

Download the study results (PDF)

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